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The World Is an Interesting Place. Math Class Should Be, Too.

At Mathalicious, we think the world is an interesting place full of interesting questions. Do people with small feet pay too much for shoes? Do taller Olympic sprinters have an unfair advantage? How have video game consoles changed over time…and are we building the Matrix?

We also think math class is the perfect place for students and teachers to explore questions like these, and that it can be the most interesting part of the day.

Many Students Think Math Class Is Boring and Irrelevant.

It’s no secret that a lot of students hate math. To them, math is just a bunch of random skills to memorize and regurgitate, and they see math class as totally disconnected from their lives. When students see no reason to learn, they don’t.

This isn’t just bad for students. All teachers want to engage their students in meaningful learning experiences. But, for a variety of reasons, many math classes are still largely characterized by rote procedures: do this, then do that. This alienates students from math and teachers from their students.

Mathalicious Helps Teachers Create a Different Kind of Math Class.

We create lessons that explore the math behind real-world topics, from sports to shopping to the odds of finding life on other planets. These lessons put teachers and students in a position to have interesting conversations that foster a classroom culture of curiosity and rigorous mathematical thinking.

Teachers who use Mathalicious lessons say they enjoy their jobs more, and that their students look forward to coming to class. Imagine that.

The Common Core Standards Emphasize Problem Solving and Critical Thinking. So Do We.

Every Mathalicious lesson is aligned to the Common Core State Standards. In fact, most lessons connect multiple content standards, and help build deep conceptual understanding through real-world contexts.

At the same time, we help teachers realize the Standards for Mathematical Practice by promoting higher-order thinking and problem solving. Mathalicious lessons challenge students to construct arguments, justify their reasoning, and use mathematics to think more critically about the world. And live more fully in it.